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Engineering Materials - Nonferrous Metals - Titanium


Materials: Non-Ferrous Metals


 
Non - Ferrous Metals

 

Titanium

There are three structural types of titanium alloys:

  • Alpha Alloys are non-heat treatable and are generally very weld- able. They have low to medium strength, good notch toughness, reasonably good ductility and possess excellent mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures. The more highly alloyed alpha and near-alpha alloys offer optimum high temperature creep strength and oxidation resistance as well.

  • Alpha-Beta Alloys are heat treatable and most are weldable. Their strength levels are medium to high. Their hot-forming qualities are good, but the high temperature creep strength is not as good as in most alpha alloys.

  • Beta or near-beta alloys are readily heat treatable, generally weldable, capable of high strengths and good creep resistance to intermediate temperatures. Excellent formability can be expected of the beta alloys in the solution treated condition. Beta-type alloys have good combinations of properties in sheet, heavy sections, fasteners and spring applications.


Zinc

Zinc, a crystalline metal with moderate strength and ductility, is seldom used alone except as a coating. In addition to its metal and alloy forms, zinc also extends the life of other materials such as steel (by hot dipping or electrogalvanizing), rubber and plastics (as an aging inhibitor), and wood (in paints). Zinc is also used to make brass, bronze, and die-casting alloys in plate, strip, and coil; foundry alloys; superplastic zinc; and activators and stabilizers for plastics.


Zirconium

Relatively few metals besides zirconium can be used in chemical processes requiring alternate contact with strong acids and alkalis. Major uses for zirconium and its alloys are as a construction material in the chemical-processing industry.

 




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