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Engineering Materials - Thermoplastic Materials


Materials: Plastics


Thermoplastic

Thermoplastics

Thermoplastic materials are melt processable, that is they are formed when the are in a melted or viscous phase. This generally means they are heated, formed, then cooled in their final shape. Depending upon their chemistry, thermoplastics can be very much like rubber, or as strong as aluminum. Some high temperature thermoplastic materials can withstand temperature extremes of up to 600 F, while others retain their properties at -100 F. Thermoplastics do not oxidize and some materials have no known solvents at room temperature. Most thermoplastic materials are excellent electrical and thermal insulators. On the other hand thermoplastic composites can be made to be electrically conductive with the addition of carbonor metal fibers.

In general the combination of light weight , high strength, and low processing costs make thermoplastics well suited to many applications. The most common methods of processing thermoplastics are injection molding, extrusion , and thermoforming.

Thermoplastics include:

ABS (Acrylanitrile Butadiene Styrene)
ABS Polycarbonate Alloy
Acetal
Acrylic
ASA (acrylic-styrene-acrylonitrile) Alloys
Cellulose Butyrate
ETFE (Tefzel)
EVA Ethylene Vinyl Acetate
LCP (Polyester Liquid Crystal Polymer)
Nylon 6
Nylon 4-6
Nylon 6-6
Nylon 11
Nylon 12
Nylon amorphous
Nylon impact modified
Polyallomer
PBT Polyester (Polybutylene Terepthalate)
Polycarbonate
PEEK Polyetheretherkeytone
PEI Polyetherimid (Ultem)
Polyethersulfone
Polyethylene High Density
Polyethylene Low Density
Polyethylene Medium Density
PET Polyester (Polyethylene Terepthalate)
Polyimide Thermoplastic (Aurum)
Polypropylene
PPA Polyphthalamide (Amodel)
PPO Modified Polyphenylene Oxide (Noryl)
PPS Polyphenylene Sulfide
Polystyrene Crystal
Polystyrene High Impact HIPS
Polystyrene Medium Impact MIPS
Polysulfone
Polyurethane
PVC Polyvinyl Chloride Rigid
PVC Flexible
PVDF Polyvinylidene Fluoride (Kynar)
SAN Styrene Acrylonitrile

TPE Thermoplastic Elastomers
TPR Thermoplastic Rubbers



 

 

 




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